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The Queen Parkade redevelopment could bring more housing, commercial space downtown PiPa News

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The Queen Parkade redevelopment could bring more housing, commercial space downtown

The City of Charlottetown wants to hear from the public about a proposed renovation of a downtown parkade and some land around it.

If it passes, Queen Parkade will be strengthened. It will also extend onto land owned by the developer, TweelCo Properties.

The expansion will add parking spaces, residential units and commercial space, according to the proposal presented to the city council on January 16.

Coun. Norman Beck says this is the kind of development the city wants to see downtown.

“As everyone knows, we’re looking to increase density in the downtown area,” Beck said.

“We’re always looking at opportunities to build on the beautiful downtown that we have here in Charlottetown, and we think this is an opportunity.”

Downtown projects are often multi-use and this proposal fits that bill, Beck said. The city said any development there must have the same amount of parking or more.

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The development will extend the back of the parkade to add 145 parking spaces, making a total of 483. On top of that space, 40 residential units will be built – with a total of eight stories, shown in plans.

Coun. Norman Beck said he was impressed with the developer’s proposal. (Alex MacIsaac/CBC)

The expansion will extend to parts of Great George Street and Fitzroy Street, making room for retail space on the ground floor.

Since the property is zoned as Downtown Core and Downtown Main Street, it can be used for apartments, bars and restaurants, offices, hotels, retail stores and more.

In its proposal to the council, the development team said its goal is to attract long-term commercial, retail and professional tenants.

Now, the city wants feedback from the public about the proposal. Comments can be made by visiting its website. Comments are due February 7.

If the project goes ahead, Beck said: “It’s something people will be proud of.”

On Friday, CBC News spoke with Chris Tweel, owner of TweelCo Properties, but he was not available for an interview.

‘Time for a big repair job’

The city-owned parkade, built in 1979, shows disrepair.

Scott Adams, public works manager for the city, said the parkade has some structural issues. “It’s time for a big repair job,” he said.

A man wearing a winter coat stands in front of a sandstone building.
Scott Adams, public works manager for the city, said the proposal would help increase housing density downtown. (Alex MacIsaac/CBC)

He said the project is expected to take three years to complete. If it continues, he said there is a chance that construction will begin later this year or early 2025.

“It depends on how long it takes to negotiate an agreement and finalize all the terms.”

Once public feedback closes in February, staff will present the council with comments and the council will decide whether they want to move forward with the proposal.

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